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Posts Tagged: security

The perfect Btrfs setup for a server

Btrfs is probably the most modern filesystem of all widely used filesystems on Linux. In this article we explain how to use Btrfs as the only filesystem on a server machine, and how that enables some sweet capabilities, like very resilient RAID-1, flexible adding or replacing of disk drives, using snapshots for quick backups and […]

Using RAID with btrfs and recovering from broken disks

Btrfs (pronounced Better FS) is a relatively new filesystem that operates on the copy-on-write principle (abbreviated COW, which stems a more friendly pronunciation for btrfs: Butter FS). Btrfs includes a lot of interesting functionality and replaces traditional Linux disk and filesystem tools like LVM (volume manager, disk snapshots) and mdadm (software RAID). In RAID usage btrfs is much more flexible […]

Cyberwar never ceases

A great deal of our work as Linux system administrators is related to security. Each server we maintain is bombarded on daily basis in a never ending cyberwar. Some of our customers (e.g. the website of the former Finnish Minister of Foreign Affairs, government websites, high profile political organisations and media sites) are obvious targets but […]

How to create good OpenPGP keys

The OpenPGP standard and the most popular open source program that implements it, GnuPG, have been well tested and widely deployed over the last decades. At least for the time being they are considered to be cryptographically unbroken tools for encrypting and verifying messages and other data. Due to the lack of easy-to-use tools and […]

Password hygiene – every man’s responsibility

Everybody knows what hand hygiene is: hands are disinfected every time we enter a hospital. In the same way as germ-free hands stops diseases from spreading, password hygiene helps to prevent the misuse of credentials. Password hygiene may feel useless when the effect is not immediately visible, but it is never the less very important […]